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Research Papers: Coatings and Solid Lubricants

Tribological Properties of Laser Microtextured Surface Bonded With Composite Solid Lubricant at High Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Xijun Hua, Peiyun Zhang, Kai Liu, Rong Wang, Jinghu Ji, Yonghong Fu

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Jiangsu University,
Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013, China

Jianguo Sun

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Jiangsu University,
Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013, China
e-mail: 15751010096@163.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received July 14, 2015; final manuscript received January 15, 2016; published online April 25, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Daniel Nélias.

J. Tribol 138(3), 031302 (Apr 25, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1264; doi: 10.1115/1.4032522 History: Received July 14, 2015; Revised January 15, 2016

A combination technology of the solid lubricant and the laser surface texturing (LST) can significantly improve the tribological properties of friction pairs. The plate sample was textured by fiber laser and composite lubricant of polyimide (PI) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) powders were filled in the microdimples. Sliding friction performances of micron-sized composite lubricant and nano-sized composite lubricant were investigated by ring-plate tribometer at temperatures ranging from room temperature (RT) to 400 °C. On the one hand, the results of the micron-sized composite lubricant show that the friction coefficient of the textured surface filled with composite lubricant (TS) exhibits the lowest level and the highest stability compared to a textured surface without solid lubrication, smooth surface without lubrication, smooth surface burnished with a layer of composite solid lubricant. The better dimple density range is 35–46%. The friction coefficients of the sample surface filled with micron-composite solid lubricant with the texture density of 35% are maintained at a low level (about 0.1) at temperatures ranging from RT to 300 °C. On the other hand, the results of the nano-sized composite lubricant show that these friction properties are better than those of MoS2-PI micron-sized composite. The friction coefficients of MoS2-PI-CNTs nano-sized composite solid lubricant are lower than those of the MoS2-PI composite lubricant at temperatures ranging from RT to 400 °C. In addition, the possible mechanisms involving the synergetic effect of the surface texture and the solid lubricant are discussed in the present work.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The physical maps of the upper sample (a) and the lower sample (b) and the sample part drawing (c)

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Fig. 2

Diagram of friction pair

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Fig. 3

The morphology of single microdimple of T sample with the texture density of 23% by a three-dimensional morphology analyzer

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Fig. 4

The morphology of microtextured surface of T sample with the texture density of 23% by a three-dimensional morphology analyzer

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Fig. 5

The morphology (a) and the profile (b) of the T sample surface with the texture density of 23% filled with composite solid lubricant by three-dimensional morphology analyzer

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Fig. 6

The figures of the MMU-10G high temperature friction and wear testing machine (a) and the test rig (b)

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Fig. 7

The friction coefficient of T sample, S sample, SS samples, and TS sample varied with time (contact pressure of 0.92 MPa, rotational speed 200 r/min)

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Fig. 8

Worn morphology of T sample (a), S sample (b), SS sample (c), and TS sample (d) after the wear test by a three-dimensional morphology analyzer

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Fig. 9

The variation of friction coefficients of TS sample with the texture density of 12%, 23%, 35%, 46%, and 58% with sliding time at RT (a) and 200 °C (b) (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm)

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Fig. 10

The friction coefficient of TS sample versus dimple density at different temperatures (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm)

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Fig. 11

The surface roughness of the upper sample versus dimple density of TS sample (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm)

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Fig. 12

The friction coefficient of TS-1 sample varied with temperature (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm, time 30 mins)

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Fig. 13

XRD patterns of the surface of TS-1 sample at RT (a), 100 °C (b), 200 °C (c), 300 °C (d), and 400 °C (e)

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Fig. 14

The friction coefficient of sample TS-1 versus rotational speed (contact pressure: 0.46 MPa; time: 30 mins)

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Fig. 15

The friction coefficient of sample TS-1 varied with load (rotate speed: 100 rpm; time: 30 mins)

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Fig. 16

Variations of the friction coefficient of TS-1 sample, TS-2 sample and TS-3 sample with the sliding time (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm, temperature 200 °C)

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Fig. 17

Variations of the friction coefficient of TS-3 sample with the sliding time at different temperatures (contact pressure of 0.46 MPa, rotational speed 100 rpm)

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Fig. 18

The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphology of the surface of the sample TS (a) and the sample S (b) after the wear test

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Fig. 19

The SEM topograph of MoS2-PI composite solid lubrication

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Fig. 20

EDS analysis on the microdimples of the TS sample after the wear test

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Fig. 21

EDS analysis on the surface between the microdimples of the TS sample after the wear test

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Fig. 22

EDS analysis on the surface of the upper sample after the wear test

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