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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

The Behavior of Intrinsic Randomness and Dynamic Abrupt Changes of Friction Force Signal During the Friction Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuankai Zhou

School of Mechatronic Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xuzhou 221116, China
e-mail: zhouyuankai@cumt.edu.cn

Hua Zhu

School of Mechatronic Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xuzhou 221116, China
e-mail: zhuhua83591917@163.com

Xue Zuo

School of Mechatronic Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xuzhou 221116, China
e-mail: zuoxue@cumt.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received October 5, 2015; final manuscript received January 9, 2016; published online May 4, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jordan Liu.

J. Tribol 138(3), 031605 (May 04, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1361; doi: 10.1115/1.4032528 History: Received October 05, 2015; Revised January 09, 2016

Experiments were performed on a ring-on-disk tribometer under lubricated conditions. Friction force was measured throughout the friction process. The parameter predictability was used to provide a quantitative description of the intrinsic randomness of the friction force. The parameter dynamic difference was used to detect the dynamic abrupt changes. The results show that, from the perspective of dynamics, the friction process can be divided into the abrupt changing process through which the intrinsic randomness is enhanced, the dynamic stable process through which the system maintains the strong intrinsic randomness, and the abrupt changing process through which the intrinsic randomness is weakened.

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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Friction , Chaos , Signals
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Figures

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Fig. 1

The photograph of ring-on-disk tribometer

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Fig. 2

Friction signals measured in friction tests: (a) test 1 (600 r/min, 280 N), (b) test 2 (600 r/min, 480 N), (c) test 3 (800 r/min, 280 N), and (d) test 4 (800 r/min, 480 N)

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Fig. 3

Predictability of friction force in the friction process: (a) test 1 (600 r/min, 280 N), (b) test 2 (600 r/min, 480 N), (c) test 3 (800 r/min, 280 N), and (d) test 4 (800 r/min, 480 N)

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Fig. 4

Background noise and its predictability: (a) background noise measured at a sliding speed of 600 r/min and (b) the predictability of background noise in each computing window

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Fig. 5

Theoretical time series containing the dynamic abrupt changes: (a) time series constructed by connecting the x components of the Chen's, Lorenz, and Rossler attractor in sequence, (b) zooming in on the time series in region A, and (c) zooming in on the time series in region B

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Fig. 6

Dynamic difference of the theoretical time series (computing parameters: m = 12, t = 4, and ε = 2)

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Fig. 7

Dynamic difference of friction force signals measured in four tests: (a) test 1 (600 r/min, 280 N), (b) test 2 (600 r/min, 480 N), (c) test 3 (800 r/min, 280 N), and (d) test 4 (800 r/min, 480 N)

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Fig. 8

Variation of surface profile of disk (the sampling length is 2 mm, and the sampling interval is 1 μm): (a) initial surface profile, (b) surface profile in the dynamic stable process, and (c) surface profile measured at the end of the test

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