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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

A Statistical Model for Torsional Friction of Plate-on-Plate Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Chengchao Niu

School of Mechanic and Electronic Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xu Zhou 221116, China
e-mail: niuchengchao66@163.com

Wang Shibo

School of Mechanic and Electronic Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xu Zhou 221116, China
e-mail: wangshb@cumt.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 23, 2015; final manuscript received January 18, 2016; published online July 20, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Mircea Teodorescu.

J. Tribol 139(1), 011402 (Jul 20, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1421; doi: 10.1115/1.4033052 History: Received November 23, 2015; Revised January 18, 2016

A statistical model for torsional friction of plate-on-plate contact is constructed. The torsional responses including T–θ curves, proportion of slip asperities, and the radius of gross slip can be obtained from the model. The torsional friction response of monomer cast (MC) nylon against 316L stainless steel was calculated with this model and a torsional friction experiment of MC nylon against 316L stainless steel was performed to verify the model. The calculated T–θ curves exhibit different shapes under different torsional angular displacements. The calculations demonstrated that the torsional regime determined only through T–θ curves was inaccurate. The statistical results of asperities located at the torsional interface more directly reflected the torsional regime. The T–θ curves obtained from theoretical calculation and experiments are consistent in shapes, whereas the torque magnitude from the theoretical calculation is larger than that from experiments. When gross slip is indicated by the maximum torque on the T–θ curves, about 93% of the contact asperities were in a slip status rather than 100% and the gross slip radius in the whole torsional contact interface was about 3 mm.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Simplified contact model of rough surfaces

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Fig. 4

Modeled results of torsion loops versus torsion angle under different radial spacings (a) and the maximum torque under different divisions of contact area (b)

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Fig. 5

Modeled results of torsional fretting loops obtained under torsion angle amplitudes of (a) 0.4 deg, (b) 1 deg, (c) 2 deg, and (d) 4 deg

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Fig. 6

Ratio of slip asperities under angular amplitudes of (a) 0.4 deg, (b) 1 deg, (c) 2 deg, and (d) 4 deg

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Fig. 7

Gross slip radius under angular displacement amplitudes of (a) 0.2 deg, (b) 0.5 deg, (c) 1 deg, and (d) 2 deg

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Fig. 2

Torsional plate-on-plate contact

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Fig. 8

Schematic diagram of the structure of plate-on-plate torsional friction tester

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Fig. 9

Experimental and modeled torsion loops from plate-on-plate contact of MC nylon and 316L stainless steel with (a) θmax = 0.5 deg, (b) θmax = 1 deg, and (c) θmax = 2 deg

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