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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Performance of Surface Texturing During Start-Up Under Starved and Mixed Lubrication

[+] Author and Article Information
Chunxing Gu

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System
and Vibration;
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiaotong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: chunxinggu@hotmail.com

Xianghui Meng

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration;
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiaotong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: xhmeng@sjtu.edu.cn

Youbai Xie

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System
and Vibration;
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiaotong University,
Shanghai 200240, China

Xiaoli Kong

Research and Development Center of China's
First Automotive Works (FAW) Group,
Changchun 130011, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 23, 2015; final manuscript received February 23, 2016; published online June 23, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jordan Liu.

J. Tribol 139(1), 011702 (Jun 23, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1304; doi: 10.1115/1.4033135 History: Received August 23, 2015; Revised February 23, 2016

In this paper, the start-up process of the ring/liner system with surface texturing is studied. By employing a thermal-mixed lubrication model considering the oil supply, the tribological behavior of the textured surface under the cold and hot start-up conditions is investigated. It is found that the friction coefficient curve under the cold start-up condition is different from the hot start-up result. The textured surface is easier to form the hydrodynamic lubrication than the smooth surface, which is helpful to separate the mixed lubricated contact surfaces. With the textured features on the ring face, the less friction heat is generated at the start-up phase. These effects could prove beneficial in applications with the frequent start and stop conditions. Besides, the inlet wedge of ring can also influence the start-up performance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Overview of the ring/liner system idealized for the mathematical model

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Fig. 2

Ring profiles for the various crown heights ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm

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Fig. 3

The inlet boundary conditions for fully flooded lubrication and starved lubrication

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Fig. 4

Thermal flow with the contact (Morris et al. [35] and Shahmohamadi et al. [37])

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Fig. 5

Overview of the start-up model

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Fig. 6

(a) The variation of sliding speed with sliding distance and (b) the variation of the lubricant viscosity with the changing temperature

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Fig. 7

The variation curves of friction coefficient: (a) under the cold start-up condition and (b) under the hot start-up condition

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Fig. 8

(a) The variation of hydrodynamic support force with sliding distance under the cold start-up condition; (b) the variation of hydrodynamic support force with sliding distance under the hot start-up condition; (c) the variation of asperity contact force with sliding distance under the cold start-up condition; and (d) the variation of asperity contact force with sliding distance under the hot start-up condition

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Fig. 9

(a) The temperature rise of lubricant, ring, and liner under the cold start-up condition; (b) the temperature rise of lubricant, ring, and liner under the hot start-up condition; (c) the temperature rise of lubricant with or without surface texturing under the cold start-up condition; and (d) the temperature rise of lubricant with or without surface texturing under the hot start-up condition

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Fig. 10

(a) The variation of the heat transfer by convection and conduction under the cold start-up condition and (b) the variation of the heat transfer by convection and conduction under the hot start-up condition

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Fig. 11

The simulation results for different ring profiles (the crown heights are ringing from 0.1 μm to 20 μm) under the cold start-up condition: (a) the friction coefficient curves for the smooth surface; (b) the friction coefficient curves for the textured ring; (c) the hydrodynamic support force various curves for the smooth surface; and (d) the hydrodynamic support force various curves for the textured ring

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Fig. 12

The simulation results for different ring profiles (the crown heights are ringing from 0.1 μm to 20 μm) under the hot start-up condition: (a) the friction coefficient curves for the smooth surface; (b) the friction coefficient curves for the textured ring; (c) the hydrodynamic support force various curves for the smooth surface; and (d) the hydrodynamic support force various curves for the textured ring

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Fig. 13

(a) The variation of friction coefficient for untextured surface, textured ring, and textured liner under the cold start-up condition and (b) the variation of friction coefficient for untextured surface, texturing ring, and textured liner under the hot start-up condition

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Fig. 14

(a) The variation of the asperity load ratio under the cold start-up condition, when 2 μm thickness oil is supplied and (b) the variation of the asperity load ratio under the hot start-up condition, when 2 μm thickness oil is supplied

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