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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Study on the High-Speed Rubbing Wear Behavior Between Ti6Al4V Blade and Nickel–Graphite Abradable Seal Coating

[+] Author and Article Information
Weihai Xue, Siyang Gao, Yang Liu, Shu Li

Institute of Metal Research,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shenyang, Liaoning 110016, China

Deli Duan

Institute of Metal Research,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shenyang, Liaoning 110016, China
e-mail: duandl@imr.ac.cn

Lu Wang

Liming Aero-Engine Group Corporation,
Shenyang, Liaoning 110016, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 26, 2015; final manuscript received April 5, 2016; published online August 11, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Dae-Eun Kim.

J. Tribol 139(2), 021604 (Aug 11, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1429; doi: 10.1115/1.4033454 History: Received November 26, 2015; Revised April 05, 2016

The wear behavior of Ti6Al4V blade rubbed against nickel–graphite (Ni–G) abradable seal coating was studied with a high-speed rub test rig. According to the test results acquired at different incursion per passes and linear speeds, blade wear increased with the increment of linear speed at a fixed incursion per pass. With incursion per pass increasing, blade wear increased when linear speed was fixed at 30 m/s, while decreased at 90 and 150 m/s. Referring to the macromorphology observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses of the wear scars, rubbing at 30 m/s, microcutting and microploughing with coating adhesion was the main blade wear mechanism while spalling accompanied by densification was the main coating wear mechanism. Rubbing at 90 and 150 m/s, plastic deformation was the main blade wear mechanism while transfer mixed layer that resulted from blade transferred was identified as the main coating wear mechanism. Quantitative analysis of coating densification and microhardness detection of the transfer mixed layer indicated that high coating densification made great contribution to low blade wear at 30 m/s and aggravated blade wear at high linear speed was due to the high frictional heat and the resultant high-hardness transfer mixed layer. It could therefore be concluded that high linear speed guarantees enough frictional heat output while low incursion per pass is responsible for the accumulation of frictional heat.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

SEM micrograph of Ni–G coating cross section

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the test rig and the contact geometry between the blade and coating

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Fig. 3

Blade weight (a) and height (b) variations after rubbing at different linear speeds and incursions per pass

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Fig. 4

Coating weight variation after rubbing at different linear speeds and incursions per pass

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Fig. 5

Blade wear scar morphologies after rubbing at different linear speeds when incursion per pass was 0.085 μm: (a) 30 m/s, SEM, (b) 30 m/s, backscattered electron microanalysis (BSEM), (c) 90 m/s, SEM, and (d) 150 m/s, SEM

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Fig. 6

Blade wear scar morphologies after rubbing at different linear speeds when incursion per pass was 7.107 μm: (a) 30 m/s, SEM, (b) 30 m/s, BSEM, (c) 90 m/s, SEM, and (d) 150 m/s, SEM

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Fig. 7

Coating wear scar macromorphologies after rubbing at different linear speeds and two incursions per pass (a) 0.085 μm and (b) 7.107 μm

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Fig. 8

Coating wear scar surface micromorphologies after rubbing at different linear speeds and two incursions per pass

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Fig. 9

Coating densification factor after rubbing at different incursions per pass and linear speeds

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Fig. 10

The micromorphology of coating wear rubbed at 30 m/s when the incursion per pass was 0.142 μm

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Fig. 11

XRD patterns of debris from unrubbed coating and coating wear scar

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Fig. 12

SEM picture of a transfer layer with tadpole-looking particle and EDS detection result of the tadpole head

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