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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

The Influence of Load and Angular Displacement Amplitude on the Torsional Fretting Wear of a Ball-on-Socket Cervical Disk Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Song Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab,
Research Institute of Tsinghua University in
Shenzhen,
Shenzhen, 518057, China

Yong Li, Qingliang Wang

School of Material Science and Engineering,
China University of Mining and Technology,
Xuzhou 221116, China

Zhenhua Liao

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab,
Research Institute of Tsinghua University in
Shenzhen,
Shenzhen 518057, China

Pingfa Feng

Department of Mechanical Engineering;State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China

Weiqiang Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab,
Research Institute of Tsinghua University in
Shenzhen,
Shenzhen 518057, China;
State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: weiqliu@hotmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 22, 2015; final manuscript received June 28, 2016; published online November 9, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Zhong Min Jin.

J. Tribol 139(3), 031602 (Nov 09, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-15-1459; doi: 10.1115/1.4034246 History: Received December 22, 2015; Revised June 28, 2016

The torsional fretting wear behaviors of artificial cervical disk were studied under different loads (50, 100, and 150 N) and angular displacement amplitudes (±2 deg, ±5 deg, and ±7 deg). The cervical prosthesis was simplified and designed as a ball-on-socket contact with the material configuration of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and thermally oxidized titanium alloy. The fretting running regime changed from mixed regime (MR) to slip regime (SR) when the angular displacement increased from 2 deg to 7 deg. The frictional torque became larger with an increasing load at all of the angular displacement amplitudes. Larger load and angular displacement amplitude also led to more severe wear for UHMWPE ball. The damage patterns for titanium socket were only slight scratches and polished tracks on the raised oxide scales. However, the dominant wear mechanism was abrasive and adhesive wear as well as deformation for UHMWPE ball. Hence, titanium socket revealed less severe damage than UHMWPE ball due to the protection of oxide film. Arc-shaped wear scars and scratches appeared in both the central and edge zones of the ball and socket component, which were rather different with that of ball-on-flat. In addition, a new damage pattern, annular stress concentration damage, occurred on the edge of UHMWPE ball characterized by severe abrasive and adhesive wear.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic (a) and actual picture (b) of the ball-on-socket contact configuration as well as schematic of torsional friction tester for ball-on-socket friction pair (c)

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Fig. 2

Surface morphology of the oxide coating on the titanium socket

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Fig. 3

T-θ curves as function of the number of cycles with a load of 100 N at different angular displacements: (a) ±2 deg, (b) ±5 deg, and (c) ±7 deg

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Fig. 4

The frictional torque with increasing cycles at different angular displacements: (a) Fn = 50 N, (b) Fn = 100 N, and (c) Fn = 150 N

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Fig. 5

The frictional torque with increasing cycles under different loads at an angular displacement of ±2 deg (a), ±5 deg (b), and ±7 deg (c)

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Fig. 6

Optical wide view on the wear surface of titanium socket: (a1) in the central zone for sample under 50 N at ±5 deg, (a2) in the edge zone for sample under 50 N at ±5 deg, (b1) in the central zone for sample under 100 N at ±2 deg, (b2) in the edge zone for sample under 100 N at ±2 deg, (c1) in the central zone for sample under 100 N at ±5 deg, (c2) in the edge zone for sample under 100 N at ±5 deg, (d1) in the central zone for sample under 100 N at ±7 deg, (d2) in the edge zone for sample under 100 N at ±7 deg, (e1) in the central zone for sample under 150 N at ±5 deg, and (e2) in the edge zone for sample under 150 N at ±5 deg

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Fig. 7

Close-up on the representative damage patterns of titanium socket by SEM: (a) plowing and scratch damage, (b) polishing damage and some wear debris, and (c) and (d) substrate damage by sliding before the oxidation process

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Fig. 8

The optical wear surface in the central zone of UHMWPE ball: (a1) wide view for sample under 50 N at ±5 deg, (a2) close-up for sample under 50 N at ±5 deg, (b1) wide view for sample under 100 N at ±2 deg, (b2) close-up for sample under 100 N at ±2 deg, (c1) wide view for sample under 100 N at ±5 deg, (c2) close-up for sample under 100 N at ±5 deg, (d1) wide view for sample under 100 N at ±7 deg, (d2) close-up for sample under 100 N at ±7 deg, (e1) wide view for sample under 150 N at ±5 deg, and (e2) close-up for sample under 150 N at ±5 deg

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Fig. 9

The optical wear micrographs in the edge zone of UHMWPE ball for sample: (a) under 50 N at ±5 deg, (b) under 100 N at ±5 deg, (c) under 100 N at ±7 deg, (d) under 150 N at ±2 deg, (e) under 150 N at ±5 deg, and (f) the annular stress concentration damage

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Fig. 10

Simulation of stress distribution for the UHMWPE ball under the load of 150 N using static structural analysis system by ansys R14.5

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Fig. 11

Close-up on the representative damage patterns of UHMWPE ball by SEM: (a) the morphology before wear test, (b) the annular stress concentration damage, and (c) the wear scars and scratches

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Fig. 12

The chemical characterization of the wear scar on UHMWPE ball: (a) the EDX analysis and (b) Raman analysis

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