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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Stratified Revised Asperity Contact Model for Worn Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Songtao Hu

State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: HSTTAOTAO@163.com

Noel Brunetiere

Institut Pprime,
CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA,
Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex 86962, France
e-mail: noel.brunetiere@univ-poitiers.fr

Weifeng Huang

State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: huangwf@tsinghua.edu.cn

Xiangfeng Liu

State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: liuxf@tsinghua.edu.cn

Yuming Wang

State Key Laboratory of Tribology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: yumingwang@tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received March 28, 2016; final manuscript received August 8, 2016; published online January 10, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Mircea Teodorescu.

J. Tribol 139(2), 021403 (Jan 10, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: TRIB-16-1099; doi: 10.1115/1.4034531 History: Received March 28, 2016; Revised August 08, 2016

Segmented bi-Gaussian stratified elastic asperity contact model of Leefe (1998, “‘Bi-Gaussian’ Representation of Worn Surface Topography in Elastic Contact Problems,” Tribol. Ser., 34, pp. 281–290), which suits for worn surfaces, has been improved. It still exhibits two drawbacks: (1) the arbitrary assumption of the probability density function (PDF) consisting of two component PDFs intersecting at a knee-point, violating the unity-area demand and (2) the preference for large roughness-scale part of the surface, leading to an error on the characterization of small roughness-scale part. A continuous bi-Gaussian stratified elastic asperity contact model is proposed based on a surface combination theory and a continuous separation method. The two stratified contact models are applied to a simulated pure bi-Gaussian surface and four real worn surfaces. The results show that the modified segmented and the continuous stratified contact models are both validated by a deterministic model with better accuracy for the continuous one.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Characterization of a two-process or worn surface

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Fig. 2

Modified segmented bi-Gaussian stratified asperity contact model between a bi-Gaussian rough surface and a smooth plane

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Fig. 3

Surface combination theory

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Fig. 4

Monospring face seal

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Fig. 5

Visualization of the simulated bi-Gaussian and the real worn surfaces: (a) simulated bi-Gaussian, (b) SiC, (c) TC, (d) RiC, and (e) MiC

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Fig. 6

Probability material ratio curves of the simulated bi-Gaussian and the real worn surfaces for asperity height and summit height: (a) simulated bi-Gaussian, (b) SiC, (c) TC, (d) RiC, and (e) MiC

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Fig. 7

Results of component separation for asperity height and summit height using the segmented and the continuous separation methods: (a) simulated bi-Gaussian, (b) SiC, (c) TC, (d) RiC, and (e) MiC

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Fig. 8

Comparison between the modified segmented stratified, the continuous stratified, and the deterministic asperity contact models: (a) simulated bi-Gaussian, (b) SiC, (c) TC, (d) RiC, and (e) MiC

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