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Research Papers: Applications

Sticking of a Linear-Guideway Type Recirculating Ball Bearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiroyuki Ohta

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Graduate School of Engineering,
Nagaoka University of Technology,
1603-1 Kamitomika,
Nagaoka 940-2188, Niigata, Japan
e-mail: ohta@mech.nagaokaut.ac.jp

Genta Hanaoka

Graduate School of Engineering,
Nagaoka University of Technology,
1603-1 Kamitomika,
Nagaoka 940-2188, Niigata, Japan
e-mail: s113067@stn.nagaokaut.ac.jp

Yusuke Ueki

Engineering Design Department,
Nippon Bearing Co., Ltd.,
2833 Chiya,
Ojiya 947-8503, Niigata, Japan
e-mail: dtd28@nb-linear.co.jp

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received March 30, 2016; final manuscript received October 2, 2016; published online March 7, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Xiaolan Ai.

J. Tribol 139(3), 031103 (Mar 07, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: TRIB-16-1101; doi: 10.1115/1.4034961 History: Received March 30, 2016; Revised October 02, 2016

In this paper, the driving force of a linear-guideway type recirculating ball bearing (linear bearing) is measured and explained as the first step toward an understanding of sticking, which is the significant increase in driving force required to move a linear bearing under back-and-forth operation with a short stroke length. First, the driving force required for operation of a test bearing (which is a linear-guideway type recirculating ball bearing with load balls) and acceleration of a moving body (which consists of a carriage of the test bearing, an arm, and weight) were measured. The measurements showed that the sticking occurred when the test bearing, under a relatively higher rolling moment load, was driven in an offset position for a certain period. Next, the driving force of a test bearing with alternating load balls and spacer balls was measured, and it was clear that the cause of the sticking was the sliding friction between rolling balls. Finally, the ball locations in the load zone of the test bearing with load balls were observed in operation, and the occurrence process of the sticking is explained.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Experimental apparatus

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Fig. 3

Driving point: (a) offset drive and (b) centered drive

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Fig. 5

Measured driving force under offset drive: (a) MR = 0 N·m and (b) MR = 4 N·m

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Fig. 6

Measured driving force under centered drive: (a) MR = 0 N·m and (b) MR = 4 N·m

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Fig. 7

Measured acceleration of moving body (offset drive): (a) MR = 0 N·m and (b) MR = 4 N·m

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Fig. 8

mx¨ and measured driving force (offset drive, MR = 4 N·m)

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Fig. 9

Sliding motion between rolling load-balls

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Fig. 10

Reduction of sliding friction between rolling load-balls by using the spacer balls

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Fig. 11

Measured driving force of the test bearing with spacer balls (offset drive, MR = 4 N·m)

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Fig. 12

Experimental apparatus for observation of ball locations in the load zone

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Fig. 13

Measured ball locations in the load zone (offset drive, MR = 4 N·m)

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