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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Effect of Bifilm Oxides on the Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Rich Al–Si Alloys

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Akaberi

Department of Materials Science
and Ceramic Engineering,
Imam Khomeini International University (IKIU),
Qazvin 34148-96816, Iran
e-mail: rteemail@gmail.com

R. Taghiabadi

Department of Materials Science
and Ceramic Engineering,
Imam Khomeini International University (IKIU),
Qazvin 34148-96816, Iran
e-mail: taghiabadi@ikiu.ac.ir

A. Razaghian

Department of Materials Science
and Ceramic Engineering,
Imam Khomeini International University (IKIU),
Qazvin 34148-96816, Iran
e-mail: razaghian_ahmad@ikiu.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 12, 2016; final manuscript received November 10, 2016; published online April 4, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Min Zou.

J. Tribol 139(5), 051602 (Apr 04, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-16-1254; doi: 10.1115/1.4035340 History: Received August 12, 2016; Revised November 10, 2016

The effect of bifilm oxides on the dry sliding wear behavior of Fe-rich (1.5 wt.%) F332 Al–Si alloy under as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions was investigated. Toward this end, the surface oxides were intentionally incorporated into the molten alloy by surface agitation. The results showed that, after sliding under the applied load of 75 N, due to the presence of bifilms, the wear rate of base (0.2 wt.% Fe) and 1.5 wt.% Fe-containing alloys increased by almost 22% and 14%, respectively. The results also indicated that, despite the positive effect on the hardness, T6 heat treatment adversely affected the wear resistance of alloys made under surface turbulence condition. This negative effect can be attributed to the expansion of bifilms which, during heat treatment, are converted to the potential sites for initiation and propagation of subsurface microcracks. However, the strengthening effect exerted by the thermally modified β-Al5FeSi platelets showed that it can compensate the negative effects of bifilm oxides because it improves the wear rate of 1.5 wt.% Fe-containing F332-T6 alloy by about 5% under the applied load of 75 N.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Cast-iron mold, (b) tensile samples dimensions, and (c) schematic diagram of the agitation equipment

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Fig. 2

Variation of wear rate with the applied load for different samples in the as-cast condition

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Fig. 3

SEM micrographs of worn surfaces of (a) 0.2Fe-AC, (b) 0.2FeA-AC, (c) 1.5Fe-AC, and(d) 1.5FeA-AC samples after sliding under the applied load of 50 N. The arrows show the sliding direction.

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Fig. 4

The effect of surface agitation on the mechanical properties of 0.2Fe-AC and 1.5Fe-AC samples: (a) tensile strength, (b) percent elongation, and (c) Brinell hardness

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Fig. 5

(a) SEM micrograph of 1.5FeA-AC sample illustrating the simultaneous occurrence of an entrained oxide, β-platelets, and shrinkage porosities and (b) the EDS spectrum of the point marked by the cross sign on the micrograph (a)

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Fig. 6

(a) and (b) SEM micrographs of the fracture surface of 1.5Fe-AC and 1.5FeA-AC samples, respectively, and (c) and (d) the EDS spectrum of the entrained oxides (marked by small arrows) and the β-platelets, respectively

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Fig. 7

SEM micrographs showing wear debris generated under the applied load of 50 N: (a)0.2Fe-AC, (b) 0.2FeA-AC, (c) 1.5Fe-AC, and (d) 1.5FeA-AC sample

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Fig. 8

Variation of wear rate with the applied load for different samples in the heat-treated condition. The wear rate values of the 0.2Fe-AC sample have been also included for comparison.

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Fig. 9

The effect of T6 heat treatment on the size and morphology of eutectic Si (SiE) (light-gray phases) and β-Al5FeSi needles (white needles as shown by arrows) in (a) 1.5Fe-AC and (b) 1.5Fe-HT samples

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Fig. 10

SEM micrograph illustrating the expansion of entrained bifilm oxides in the course of heat treatment (as indicated by arrows on the figure) in 1.5FeA-HT sample

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Fig. 11

SEM micrographs of worn surfaces of (a) 0.2Fe-HT, (b) 0.2FeA-HT, (c) 1.5Fe-HT, and (d) 1.5FeA-HT samples after sliding under the applied load of 50 N. The arrows show the sliding direction.

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Fig. 12

SEM micrographs showing wear debris generated under the applied load of 50 N: (a) 0.2Fe-HT and (b) 1.5Fe-HT samples

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