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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Nonlubricated Sliding Wear Behavior Study of SiC–B4C–Si Cermet Against a Diamond Indenter

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Sahani

Department of Metallurgical
and Materials Engineering,
National Institute of Technology,
Rourkela 769008, India

D. Chaira

Department of Metallurgical
and Materials Engineering,
National Institute of Technology,
Rourkela 769008, India
e-mail: chaira.debasis@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received August 9, 2016; final manuscript received November 20, 2016; published online April 4, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Dae-Eun Kim.

J. Tribol 139(5), 051601 (Apr 04, 2017) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-16-1249; doi: 10.1115/1.4035344 History: Received August 09, 2016; Revised November 20, 2016

The nonlubricated sliding wear of SiC–B4C–Si cermets against a diamond indenter was studied. The cermets containing 2, 5, 10, and 20 wt.% of Si were fabricated by both conventional sintering and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. It has been observed that wear depth, volume of the wear debris, and wear rate increases with increasing applied load for both cases. Minimum wear depth and lowest wear rate was obtained for the cermet containing 10 wt.% Si. Three-body abrasion is the main wear mechanism which results in surface delamination, and formation of grooves and cavities on the damaged surface.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of wear testing setup

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Fig. 2

Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of different wt.% of Si addition in SiC–B4C-based cermet: (a)–(d) spark plasma sintered samples and (e)–(h) conventional sintered samples

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Fig. 3

(a) XRD spectra of 2, 5, 10, and 20 wt.% Si cermet sintered by conventional sintering and (b) XRD spectra of 5, 10, and 20 wt.% Si cermet sintered by SPS

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Fig. 4

(a) Wear depth (μm) versus sliding time (s) plot for the conventional sintered samples at 40 N loading condition and (b)–(d) SPS samples at 40, 60, and 80 N loading condition

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Fig. 5

Surface profilometer data of depth of the worn region of (a) conventionally sintered sample containing 10 wt.% Si using 40 N applied load and (b) SPS sample using 80 N applied load

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Fig. 6

SEM micrographs of the SPS sintered samples at 60 N applied load showing the value of wear track width for all the cermet samples

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Fig. 7

SEM micrographs of worn surfaces of SPS samples of 60SiC38B4C2Si, 60SiC35B4C5Si, 60SiC30B4C10Si, and 60SiC20B4C20Si compositions after wear test at 60 N load

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Fig. 8

SEM micrographs of the conventionally sintered samples (for Si 10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) showing the wear behavior

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Fig. 9

SEM micrographs of worn surfaces of sample containing 10 wt.% Si consolidated by SPS method and tested at 40, 60, and 80 N applied load showing abrasive grooves

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Fig. 10

Schematic diagram of various wear mechanisms involved in SiC–B4C-based ceramic composites

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Fig. 11

Effect of applied load on wear rate of all the conventional sintered and SPS samples

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Fig. 12

(a)–(d) SEM images of wear debris of SPS samples containing Si 10 z tested at 20, 40, 60, and 80 N applied load, respectively

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Fig. 13

XRD analysis of the wear debris produced for Si 20 wt.% sample sintered by SPS process at an applied load of 80 N

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Fig. 14

Bar diagram showing volume loss versus applied load of conventionally sintered samples and SPS samples by Archard equation

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