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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

An Analytical Model of Mechanistic Wear of Polymers

[+] Author and Article Information
Sandip Panda

Tribology Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India
e-mail: sandippanda13@gmail.com

Mihir Sarangi, S. K. Roy Chowdhury

Tribology Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received January 25, 2017; final manuscript received June 2, 2017; published online August 22, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Sinan Muftu.

J. Tribol 140(1), 011609 (Aug 22, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: TRIB-17-1036; doi: 10.1115/1.4037136 History: Received January 25, 2017; Revised June 02, 2017

This paper proposes a wear model for polymers based on so-called mechanistic processes comprising both low cycle fatigue and abrasive wear mechanisms, which are prominent in polymer–metal sliding interfaces. Repeated elastic contact causes localized fatigue, whereas abrasive part is an anticipatory outcome of plastic contacts by hard metal asperities on to soft polymer surface. Further, presuming adhesive interactions in elastic–plastic contacts, asperity contact theories with necessary modifications were analyzed to assess load and separation for their subsequent use in elementary wear correlations. Both Gaussian and Weibull distributions of asperity heights were considered to include statistics of surface microgeometry. Finally, volumetric wear was written in terms of roughness parameters, material properties, and sliding distance. Validation was conducted extensively, and reliability of the formulation was achieved to a large extent. Experimental part of this work included several pin-on-disk tests using polyether ether ketone (PEEK) pins and 316L stainless steel disks. Disks with different roughness characteristics generated by polishing, turning, and milling were tested. Experimental results agreed well with predictions for the polished surface and with some deviations for other two surfaces. Further, fatigue to abrasive wear ratio was identified as an analytical tool to predict prevailing wear mechanism for polymer-metal tribo-systems. After examining the considered cases, it was both interesting and physically intuitive to observe a complete changeover in wear mechanisms following simply an alteration of roughness characteristics.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Optical microscopy on worn-out pin surface after 30 min sliding of an inclined polyether ether ketone (PEEK) pin against a polished 316L disk surface (leftward arrows correspond to sliding directions): (a) load = 6 N, sliding speed = 0.5 m/s and (b) load = 2 N, sliding speed = 0.5 m/s

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Fig. 2

Elastic–plastic contact of a single spherical protuberance

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Fig. 3

Schematic of repetitive contact during sliding: (a) conformal contacts (e.g., perpendicular pin-on-disk system) and (b) nonconformal contacts (e.g., ball-on-disk system)

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Fig. 4

Predicted and experimental wear of PEEK pins against 316L steel disk surfaces: (a) for polished surface, (b) for turned surface, and (c) for milled surface

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Fig. 5

Comparative validation of predicted wear rate (input parameters are taken from Ref. [24])

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Fig. 6

Predicted wear with respect to load for three polymers and three different roughness characteristics of 316L steel disk as counter surfaces: (a) for polished surface, (b) for turned surface, and (c) for milled surface

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Fig. 7

Fatigue to abrasive wear transition (for PMMA and PVC as per Ref. [24])

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Fig. 8

Fatigue to abrasive wear transition for three polymers with respect to load and different roughness characteristics of counter surfaces: (a) for polished surface, (b) for turned surface, and (c) for milled surface

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