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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Thermal and Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber-Filled Functionally Graded Material-Based Polyamide 66 Spur Gears Manufactured by a Novel Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Akant Kumar Singh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur,
Hamirpur 177005, India
e-mail: akant.nith@gmail.com

Siddhartha

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur,
Hamirpur 177005, India
e-mail: sid.fgm@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received March 5, 2017; final manuscript received June 6, 2017; published online August 24, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Dae-Eun Kim.

J. Tribol 140(2), 021601 (Aug 24, 2017) (16 pages) Paper No: TRIB-17-1069; doi: 10.1115/1.4037335 History: Received March 05, 2017; Revised June 06, 2017

This research work presents a modified mathematical method to estimate the specific wear rate of spur gears for specified service conditions by calculating the coordinates of the point on the involute of gear tooth profile. This work stands apart in a way that an entirely novel manufacturing process developed in-house is used to fabricate functionally graded materials (FGMs) based thermoplastic gears, which have never been explored before, and the specific wear rate of manufactured gears is estimated using the proposed method. FGM and homogeneous gears are manufactured by means of an especially designed mold and a punch. Polyamide 66 (PA66) filled with 15 wt. % and 30 wt. % glass fibers is used to fabricate FGM and homogeneous gears. Neat PA66 gear is also fabricated for comparative study. Gradation in FGM gears is verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and hardness measurements. Thermal and wear tests of the gears are conducted over a range of rotational speed (500–1700 rpm) and torque (0.8–3.2 N·m). Thermal and wear behavior of developed gears is successfully analyzed using Taguchi methodology and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The service life of FGM gears is found to be superior as compared to unfilled and homogeneous gear. FGM gear filled with 30 wt. % glass fiber exhibited minimum gear tooth surface temperature and specific wear rate among all the fabricated gears.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Coordinates of points on involute profile

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Fig. 2

Parameters used in the formulation of the specific wear rat equation

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Fig. 3

Pictorial view of the mold design on pro-e software

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Fig. 4

Pictorial view of fabricated samples: (a) unfilled PA66 gear, (b) FGM gear filled with 15 wt. % glass fiber, (c) FGM gear filled with 30 wt. % glass fiber, (d) homogeneous gear filled with 15 wt. % glass fiber, and (e) homogeneous gear filled with 30 wt. % glass fiber

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Fig. 5

Pictorial view of polymer gear test rig

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Fig. 6

Representation of locations for SEM and hardness test

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Fig. 7

SEM image of 30 wt. % glass fiber reinforced FGM gear: (a) location L0 (at the center), (b) location L1 (near to root circle), and (c) location L2 (in the gear tooth)

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Fig. 8

SEM image of 30 wt. % glass fiber reinforced homogeneous gear: (a) location L0 (at the center), (b) location L1 (near to root circle), and (c) location L2 (in the gear tooth)

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Fig. 9

(a) Gear tooth surface temperature versus speed of homogeneous and FGMs gear at torque 0.8, (b) gear tooth surface temperature versus speed of homogeneous and FGMs gear at torque 2.6, (c) gear tooth surface temperature versus torque of homogeneous and FGMs gear at speed 500 rpm, and (d) gear tooth surface temperature versus torque of homogeneous and FGMs gear at speed 1400 rpm

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Fig. 10

(a) Specific wear rate versus speed of homogeneous and FGMs gear at torque 0.8 N·m, (b) specific wear rate versus speed of homogeneous and FGMs gear at torque 2.6 N·m, (c) specific wear rate versus torque of homogeneous and FGMs gear at speed 500 rpm, and (d) specific wear rate versus torque of homogeneous and FGMs gear at speed 1400 rpm

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Fig. 11

Effect of gear rotational speed and applied torque on the tooth loading rate

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Fig. 12

Effect of control factors on specific wear rate: (a) neat and homogeneous gear and (b) neat and FGM gear

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Fig. 13

Effect of control factors on gear tooth surface temperature: (a) neat and homogeneous gear and (b) neat and FGM gear

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Fig. 14

Reduction in gear tooth thickness

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Fig. 15

Worn surface of gears after completing 5 × 106 cycles: (a) PA66F30G, (b) PA66H30G, and (c) PA66F15G

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Fig. 16

Worn surface of NPA66 gear

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Fig. 17

Worn surface of PA66H15G gear

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