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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Normal Damping Model of Mechanical Joints Interfaces Considering Asperities in Lateral Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhiqiang Gao

School of Mechanical and Precision
Instrument Engineering,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an 710048, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: gaozhiqiangjk@163.com

Weiping Fu

School of Mechanical and Precision
Instrument Engineering,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an 710048, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: weipingf@xaut.edu.cn

Wen Wang

School of Mechanical and Precision
Instrument Engineering,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an 710048, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: wangwen@xaut.edu.cn

Leiting Lou

School of Mechanical and Precision
Instrument Engineering,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an 710048, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: 434529327@qq.com

Jiebei Wu

School of Mechanical and Precision
Instrument Engineering,
Xi'an University of Technology,
Xi'an 710048, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: 377708255@qq.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 21, 2016; final manuscript received September 2, 2017; published online October 9, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Stephen Boedo.

J. Tribol 140(2), 021404 (Oct 09, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: TRIB-16-1362; doi: 10.1115/1.4037954 History: Received November 21, 2016; Revised September 02, 2017

A mechanical interface behaves as the stiffness and damping when the interface is bearing a static normal force and a sine normal exciting force. For the interfacial normal damping, a calculating model was proposed. This proposed model studied the lateral contact (shoulder–shoulder contact) between upper and lower asperities in the elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic stages, which is neglected by other classical models. The normal force can be divided into a normal component and a tangential component when two asperities are contacting in dislocation. The relation between the loading–unloading normal component forces and deformation can be calculated, and then the strain energy dissipation between asperities can be gotten by integral. The friction energy dissipation also can be calculated based on the relation between loading–unloading tangential component forces and the slippage. Furthermore, the total interfacial energy dissipation can be obtained according to the statistical theory. Finally, the equivalent viscous damping is estimated using the vibration theory. The proposed model and classical models are compared by simulation and experiment, and it was found that the interfacial damping of the proposed model is more than the damping of the classical models. Moreover, the proposed model is consistent with the experimental results.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The lateral contact of a pair of asperities under static and dynamic normal forces

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Fig. 2

Contact force versus dimensionless separation

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Fig. 3

Contact area versus contact force

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Fig. 4

Contact damping versus dimensionless separation

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Fig. 5

Contact damping versus dimensionless deformation

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Fig. 6

Contact damping versus dimensionless amplitude of dynamic deformation

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Fig. 7

Interfacial damping versus dimensionless contact force

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Fig. 8

Contact damping versus frequency

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Fig. 9

1—box body, 2—lower test piece, 3—upper test piece, 4—eddy current displacement sensor, 5—normal force screw, 6—normal force sleeve, 7—thrust bearing, 8—connecting shaft, 9—static force transducer, 10—set piece, 11—dynamic force sensor, and 12—pedestal. (a) The cross section picture and (b) the photograph of real products.

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Fig. 10

The data acquisition and analysis system: (a) the schematic diagram of the data acquisition and analysis system and (b) the photograph of the data acquisition and analysis system

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Fig. 11

The mechanical model of joint surface

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Fig. 12

The verification of the relationship between damping and amplitude

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Fig. 13

The verification of the relationship between damping and frequency

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Fig. 14

The verification of the relationship between damping and pressure

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