0
research-article

Numerical Investigation of Air-Oil-Thermal Coupling Mechanism in Floating Ring Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
Wang Yan

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 100084
brucewanglegend@foxmail.com

Ren Xiao-dong

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 100084
rxd@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Li Xue-song

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 100084
xs-li@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Gu Chun-wei

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 100084
gcw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038099 History: Received April 02, 2017; Revised September 13, 2017

Abstract

Floating ring bearings (FRBs) are widely used in automobile turbochargers. However, there is no satisfying explanations of phenomenon that ring rotation speed levels off when the shaft speed reaches a certain value under low oil-supplied pressure condition. The traditional opinion that effective viscosity decreases with increasing temperature cannot completely explain this phenomenon. In this study, the air entrainment effect is introduced and evaluated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD results considering air entrainment, viscous heating, and heat transfer are compared with experimental results to evaluate each effect. The decrease in effective viscosity as a result of air-oil-thermal coupling effect is the mechanism behind the abovementioned phenomenon. This study provides calculated data and visual results of the air entrainment in low oil-supplied pressure FRB.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In