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research-article

Phase change of carbon atoms in surface layer under nano cutting during diamond lapping process

[+] Author and Article Information
Ning Yang

Institute of Machinery Manufacturing Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610299, China
yangning0706@126.com

Zhihui Xia

Institute of Machinery Manufacturing Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610299, China
xzhui01@163.com

Xingjun Wang

Institute of Machinery Manufacturing Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610299, China
wxj-my@163.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038407 History: Received March 27, 2017; Revised September 27, 2017

Abstract

Lapping is still an efficient and economical way in diamond shaping process, which is important in both industrial and scientific applications. It has known that the material removal originates from the phase change or amorphization of diamond crystal carbon atoms which is chemically activated by stress and forming a topmost layer of amorphous carbon atoms. In this paper, the phase change of amorphous carbon atoms undergoing nano cutting of amorphous layer during diamond lapping process is studied by molecular dynamics(MD) simulation. Two regions, the debris layer and cutting surface underneath, are focused. In the debris layer, change of sp2 carbon atoms is directly affected by impact, while underneath the cutting surface the changes of carbon atoms are almost not affected; the change speed of amorphous carbon atoms is higher than that of pristine crystal ones; main phase change is transformation of sp3 into sp2; cutting depth to different extent affects the phase changes of sp3 and sp2 carbon atoms. Our study expands the understanding of diamond lapping process.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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