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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Storage and Loss Characteristics of Coupled Poroviscoelastic and Hydrodynamic Systems for Biomimetic Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Patrick A. Smyth

Georgia Institute of Technology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: pasmyth4@gatech.edu

Itzhak Green

Georgia Institute of Technology,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: itzhak.green@me.gatech.edu

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received October 17, 2017; final manuscript received December 17, 2017; published online February 9, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Min Zou.

J. Tribol 140(4), 041703 (Feb 09, 2018) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-17-1392; doi: 10.1115/1.4038958 History: Received October 17, 2017; Revised December 17, 2017

Biotribology and biomechanics are evolving fields that draw from many disciplines. A natural relationship particularly exists between tribology and biology because many biological systems rely on tribophysics for adhesion, lubrication, and locomotion. This leads to many biomimetic inspirations and applications. The current study looks to mimic the function of articular cartilage in purely mechanical systems. To accomplish this goal, a novel coupling of phenomena is utilized. A flexible, porous, viscoelastic material is paired with a hydrodynamic load to assess the feasibility and benefit of a biomimetic thrust bearing. This study presents the dynamic properties of the coupled system, as determined from transient to steady operating states. The results indicate that bio-inspired bearings may have application in certain tribological systems, including biomechanical joint replacements, dampers, flexible rotordynamic bearings, and seals.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Thrust bearing before and after load perturbation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Mechanical analogy for the compliance models used to determine force/displacement relationship: (a) Kelvin–Voigt viscoelastic model and (b) fractional representation of the Kelvin–Voigt viscoelastic model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Change in bearing height due to a 2% (ΔW = 12 N/m) load perturbation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Compliance, storage and loss in the rigid/nonporous case: (a) compliance in the rigid/nonporous case, with fit given in Table 2 and (b) storage and loss in the rigid/nonporous case

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Compliance in the rigid/porous cases

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Fig. 6

Fluid and solid boundary conditions on porous pad (case I): (a) fluid pressure boundary conditions on the PVE pad and (b) solid boundary conditions on the PVE pad

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Compliance, storage and loss in the rigid/nonporous and flexible/nonporous cases: (a) compliance in the rigid/nonporous case versus the flexible/nonporous case and (b) storage and loss in the rigid/nonporous case versus the flexible/nonporous case

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Two element chain of fractional Kelvin–Voigt elements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Final steady-state results of rigid/nonporous and flexible/nonporous solutions: (a) film thicknesses of the rigid/nonporous and flexible/nonporous cases and (b) pressure profiles of the rigid/nonporous and flexible/nonporous cases

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Compliance, storage and loss in the flexible/porous cases: (a) compliance in the flexible/porous cases and (b) storage and loss in the flexible/porous cases

Tables

Errata

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