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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Study of Erosion–Corrosion and Corrosion Behavior of Commercially Pure-Ti During Slurry Erosion

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Khayatan

School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 14399-57131, Iran
e-mail: negar.khayatan@ut.ac.ir

H. M. Ghasemi

School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 14399-57131, Iran
e-mail: hghasemi@ut.ac.ir

M. Abedini

Department of Metallurgy and
Materials Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering,
University of Kashan,
Kashan 87317-53153, Iran
e-mail: mabedini@kashanu.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received December 18, 2017; final manuscript received April 23, 2018; published online June 13, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Xiaolei Wang.

J. Tribol 140(6), 061609 (Jun 13, 2018) (9 pages) Paper No: TRIB-17-1485; doi: 10.1115/1.4040156 History: Received December 18, 2017; Revised April 23, 2018

The erosion–corrosion (EC) and pure erosion of commercially pure titanium have been investigated in a 3.5% sodium chloride solution containing 10, 30, and 60 g/l SiO2 particles with an average size of 318 μm. The tests were performed at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s under two impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg. Polarization technique was used to study corrosion behavior of the material during erosion–corrosion. The eroded surfaces were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a surface profilometer. The pure erosion, corrosion, and erosion–corrosion rates increased as impact velocity and sand concentration increased. The corrosion rates of the eroding surfaces under a normal impact were lower than those at an impact angle of 40 deg. The S/T ratio, i.e., the ratio of synergy to erosion–corrosion rates was about 80% at an impact velocity of 4 m/s, which indicated the high effect of the electrochemical corrosion on the degradation of CP-Ti at low velocity. The S/T ratio decreased to 30% and 15% at the impact velocities of 6 and 9 m/s, respectively. The S/T ratio was also decreased with increasing sand concentration indicating a greater role of mechanical degradation upon the erosion–corrosion rate in the concentrated slurries.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Erosion–corrosion (T), erosion (W0), and synergy (S) rates of CP-Ti at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s in a slurry containing 60 g/l SiO2 under an impact angle of 40 deg

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Fig. 8

Erosion–corrosion (T), erosion (W0), and synergy (S) rates of CP-Ti at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s in a slurry containing 60 g/l SiO2 under an impact angle of 90 deg

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Fig. 6

Average surface roughness of the samples after the erosion–corrosion tests in sand concentration of 60 g/l at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s under impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg

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Fig. 5

SEM images of the surface of samples after the erosion–corrosion tests in a slurry containing 60 g/l SiO2 under two impact angles of; ((a), (c), and (e)) 40 deg, and ((b), (d), and (f)) 90 deg at impact velocities of; ((a) and (b)) 4 m/s; ((c) and (d)) 6 m/s; ((e) and (f)) 9 m/s. The erosion direction is indicated by the arrows.

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Fig. 4

Corrosion rates of CP-Ti under stagnant and erosion–corrosion conditions at various impact velocities and angles obtained from the polarization plots in Figs. 3 and 4

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Fig. 3

Polarization plots of CP-Ti during erosion–corrosion at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s in a slurry containing 60 g/l SiO2 under an impact angle of 90 deg. The polarization curve in the stagnant solution is also presented.

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Fig. 2

Polarization plots of CP-Ti in stagnant solution and during erosion–corrosion at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s in a slurry containing 60 g/l erodent particles at impact angle of 40 deg

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Fig. 1

The slurry impingement setup: (1) electropump, (2) velocity controller, (3) reference electrode, (4) counter electrode, (5) nozzle, (6) sample, and (7) potentiostat

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Fig. 9

S/T values (i.e., the ratio of synergy to erosion–corrosion rates) at impact velocities of 4, 6, and 9 m/s in a slurry containing 60 g/l SiO2 under impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg

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Fig. 10

Polarization plots of CP-Ti during erosion–corrosion at a velocity of 9 m/s in slurries containing 10, 30, and 60 g/l SiO2 under an impact angle of 40 deg. The polarization curve in the stagnant solution is also presented.

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Fig. 11

Polarization plots of CP-Ti during erosion–corrosion at a velocity of 9 m/s in slurries containing 10, 30, and 60 g/l SiO2 under an impact angle of 90 deg. The polarization curve in the stagnant solution is also presented.

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Fig. 12

Corrosion rates of CP-Ti under stagnant and erosion–corrosion conditions in various sand concentrations, under impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg and impact velocity of 9 m/s

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Fig. 13

Average surface roughness of the samples after the erosion–corrosion tests at sand concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 g/l SiO2, impact velocity of 9 m/s and impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg

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Fig. 14

SEM images of the erosion–corrosion surfaces in a slurry containing 10 g/l SiO2 at an impact velocity of 9 m/s under impact angles of (a) 40 deg and (b) 90 deg. The arrow shows the erosion direction.

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Fig. 15

Erosion–corrosion (T), erosion (W0), and synergy (S) rates at sand concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 g/l and an impact velocity of 9 m/s under an impact angle of 40 deg

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Fig. 16

Erosion–corrosion (T), erosion (W0), and synergy (S) rates at sand concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 g/l and an impact velocity of 9 m/s under an impact angle of 90 deg

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Fig. 17

S/T values (i.e., the ratio of synergy to erosion–corrosion rate) at an impact velocity of 9 m/s in slurries containing 10, 30, and 60 g/l SiO2 under impact angles of 40 deg and 90 deg

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