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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

The Wear and Friction Characters of Polycrystalline Diamond Under Wetting Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Chun Liu

IoT Perception Mine Research Center,
China University of Mining and
Technology (CUMT),
Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu, China

Zhongyi Man

Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire
Control for Coal Mines,
China University of Mining and
Technology (CUMT),
Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu, China
e-mail: CUMT_MZY@163.com

Fubao Zhou

Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire
Control for Coal Mines;
National Engineering Research
Center for Coal Gas Control,
China University of Mining and
Technology (CUMT),
Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu, China

Kai Chen

School of Materials Science and Engineering,
China University of Mining and
Technology (CUMT),
Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu, China

Haiyang Yu

Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire
Control for Coal Mines,
China University of Mining and
Technology (CUMT),
Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received November 2, 2017; final manuscript received September 4, 2018; published online November 1, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Satish V. Kailas.

J. Tribol 141(2), 021607 (Nov 01, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: TRIB-17-1415; doi: 10.1115/1.4041397 History: Received November 02, 2017; Revised September 04, 2018

Polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDCs) are the main cutting unit of drill bits and are a major factor in determining the drilling efficiency and service life of drill bits. Drill bit failure is caused by the severe abrasive wear it undergoes during the drilling process. The drill bit failure can prolong the drilling period, which can result in borehole instability and cause collapse in the material. A solution that can address this issue is developing an appropriate drilling method that can expel the dust in a manner that will not increase the abrasive wear on the drill bit. Here, an Amsler friction and wear-testing machines was used to investigate the friction and wear characteristics of PDC and to study the effects of the dust expelled during drilling on the wear performance of drill bits under dry air and wetting conditions. The microstructures of the worn surfaces were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and metalloscope. In addition, the chemical compositions of the PDCs' surfaces were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) after the wear and friction tests. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficients and wear rate obtained in dry air were higher than those under wetting conditions. As expected, these values are mainly ascribed to the absence of the absorber layer and lubrication under dry air. Furthermore, under wetting conditions a number of cracks were observed on the PDC surface after testing at 700 °C, which was mainly caused by two factors: The different thermal expansion coefficients between the diamond and Cobalt phase; and the residual stress generated inside the PDC under wetting conditions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Amsler friction and wear-testing machine

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Fig. 2

Variation of friction coefficient of the PDCs with the friction time at different wear loads in dry air and water: (a) thermally treated at 600 °C and with load 300 N, (b) thermally treated at 600 °C and with load 600 N, (c) thermally treated at 700 °C and with load 300 N, (d) thermally treated at 700 °C and with load 600 N, (e) thermally treated at 800 °C and with load 300 N, and (f) thermally treated at 800 °C and with load 600 N

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Fig. 3

The average friction coefficient at different wear load: (a) dry air and (b) wetting condition

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Fig. 4

Wear loss of PDCs at different thermal treatment temperature and at different wear loads: (a) dry air and (b) wetting condition

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Fig. 5

X-ray diffraction of PDC surface after thermally treated at different temperatures

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Fig. 6

Metalloscope micrographs of the worn surface of PDCs after rotating test at 600 N under dry air: (a) thermally treated at 600 °C, (b) thermally treated at 700 °C, and (c) thermally treated at 800 °C

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Fig. 7

Metalloscope micrographs of the worn surface of PDCs after rotating test at 600 N under wetting condition: (a) thermally treated at 600 °C, (b) thermally treated at 700 °C, and (c) thermally treated at 800 °C

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Fig. 8

Wear scars of the GCr15 cylinder surface in wetting condition at load of 600 N: (a) PDC thermally treated at 600 °C, (b) PDC thermally treated at 700 °C, and (c) PDC thermally treated at 800 °C

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Fig. 9

Wear scars of the GCr15 cylinder surface in dry air condition at load of 600 N: (a) PDC thermally treated at 600 °C, (b) PDC thermally treated at 700 °C, and (c) PDC thermally treated at 800 °C

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Fig. 10

Scanning electron microscope micrographs of the worn surface after rotating test under dry air at the load of 600 N: (a) the worn surfaces of the PCD, (b) enlarged view of worn surfaces corresponding to (a), (c) enlarged view of worn surfaces corresponding to (b), and (d) enlarged view of worn surfaces corresponding to (c)

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Fig. 11

Energy dispersive spectrum surface chemical analysis of composition marked in point A of Fig. 10(d)

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Fig. 12

Scanning electron microscope micrographs of the worn surface after rotating test under wetting condition at the load of 600 N: (a) the worn surfaces of the PCD, (b) enlarged view of the worn surfaces corresponding to the cracks, (c) enlarged view of cracks corresponding to (b), and (d) enlarged view of cracks corresponding to (c)

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