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Research Papers: Other (Seals, Manufacturing)

Hybrid Polymer Gear Concepts to Improve Thermal Behavior

[+] Author and Article Information
Carlos M. C. G. Fernandes

INEGI,
Universidade do Porto,
Campus FEUP,
Rua Roberto Frias 400,
Porto 4200-465, Portugal
e-mail: cfernandes@inegi.up.pt

Diogo M. P. Rocha, Jorge H. O. Seabra

FEUP,
Universidade do Porto,
Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n,
Porto 4200-465, Portugal

Ramiro C. Martins

ISEP,
Instituto Politécnico do Porto,
Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 431,
Porto 422-072, Portugal

Luís Magalhães

ISEP,
Instituto Politécnico do Porto,
Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 431,
Porto 4200-072, Portugal

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received January 17, 2018; final manuscript received September 7, 2018; published online November 13, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Sinan Muftu.

J. Tribol 141(3), 032201 (Nov 13, 2018) (12 pages) Paper No: TRIB-18-1025; doi: 10.1115/1.4041461 History: Received January 17, 2018; Revised September 07, 2018

A drawback of polymer materials is their low thermal conductivity which affects the operating temperature of polymer gears. The mechanical properties of a polymer gear are critically dependent on the maximum operating temperature. In order to improve thermal behavior of polymer gears, a hybrid polymer gear concept is suggested which consists of a polymer gear tooth with a metallic insert to promote heat evacuation from the meshing surface. The material selection based on finite element method (FEM) simulations showed that an aluminum insert performed better than copper and steel for a hybrid polymer gear. The results show that an aluminum insert increases the mass by 9% in comparison with a standard polymer gear but it decreases the maximum operating temperature by 28%. Insert geometries of different complexity were studied and their influence on operating temperature assessed.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometrical parameters of the basic hybrid-gear model

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Fig. 2

Temperature drop and fundamentals modes of heat transfer at thermal joint between two bodies: (a) temperature drop [22] and (b) modes of heat transfer [23]

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Fig. 3

Transformation of two contact surface into one rough surface with Ref. [24]

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Fig. 4

Elemental flow channel [22]

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Fig. 5

Maximum and minimum temperature for each material for the first hybrid gear model: (a) maximum temperature for each material and (b) minimum temperature for each material

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Fig. 6

Maximum and minimum temperature for an aluminum insert: (a) 0.1 MPa (Tmax = 135.2 °C, Tmin = 33.0 °C), (b) 10 MPa (Tmax = 128.7 °C, Tmin = 34.9 °C), and (c) 50 MPa (Tmax = 128.3 °C, Tmin = 35.0 °C)

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Fig. 7

Maximum and minimum temperature versus plate width w: (a) maximum temperature for each plate width and (b) minimum temperature for each plate width

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Fig. 8

Maximum and minimum temperature versus lateral gap e: (a) maximum temperature for each lateral gap and (b) minimum temperature for each lateral gap

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Fig. 9

Maximum and minimum temperature versus tip gap t: (a) maximum temperature for each tip gap and (b) minimum temperature for each tip gap

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Fig. 10

Different insert geometries with e = 0 mm. (a) Plate: w = 1.125 mm, t = 4.5 mm. (b) T-profile: w = 1.125 mm, t = 4.5 mm, and wh = 1.125 mm. (c) Double T-profile: w = 0.450 mm, t = 2.250 mm, and wh = 1.125 mm. (d) Involute: w = 0.450 mm, t = 2.250 mm.

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Fig. 11

Temperature distribution for different insert geometries (25 MPa): (a) Plate (Tmax = 123.5 °C, Tmin = 35.0 °C), (b) T-profile (Tmax = 115.9 °C, Tmin = 37.6 °C), (c) Double T-profile (Tmax = 100.7 °C, Tmin = 40.7 °C), and (d) Involute (Tmax = 99.6 °C, Tmin = 42.3 °C)

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