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Research Papers: Friction and Wear

Prediction of Surface Wear of Involute Gears Based on a Modified Fractal Method

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Li

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
Baltimore County,
1000 Hilltop Circle,
Baltimore, MD 21250
e-mail: ligangteller@163.com

Z. H. Wang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Shanghai for
Science and Technology,
Shanghai 200093, China
e-mail: wang_zhonghou18@163.com

W. D. Zhu

Fellow ASME
Division of Dynamics and Control,
School of Astronautics,
Harbin Institute of Technology,
Harbin 150001, China;
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
Baltimore County,
1000 Hilltop Circle,
Baltimore, MD 21250
e-mail: wzhu@umbc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TRIBOLOGY. Manuscript received February 9, 2018; final manuscript received September 20, 2018; published online November 8, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Sinan Muftu.

J. Tribol 141(3), 031603 (Nov 08, 2018) (13 pages) Paper No: TRIB-18-1063; doi: 10.1115/1.4041587 History: Received February 09, 2018; Revised September 20, 2018

A new wear prediction method of tooth surfaces of involute gears based on a real tooth surface model and a modified fractal method is developed. The real tooth surface model of an involute gear pair is introduced, and microgeometry feature detection of tooth surfaces is achieved by monitoring variations of normal vectors of each discrete data point of the real tooth surface model. To predict wear progression of tooth surfaces of a gear pair, an abrasive wear analysis model and the modified fractal method are used to analyze contact performance and its changes with accumulation of surface wear. The abrasive wear analysis model can analyze wear depths of gear tooth surfaces with sliding distances, local contact pressure, and directions of wear progression based on Archard's model. The modified fractal method is proposed to calculate instantaneous contact stiffness and estimate elastic and plastic deformation regions based on an asperity contact model. Microgeometry features of tooth surface asperities can be described as the basis of an asperity contact model and allow tooth contact analysis of real tooth surface models with their local microgeometry feature changes due to plastic deformations. Feasibility and effectiveness of this wear prediction method were verified by comparing predicted results of gear surface wear progression with gear wear test results.

Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Topics: Wear , Stress , Gears , Fractals
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Tooth surfaces of the gear specimen with grinding grain after hear treatment and form-grinding

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Fig. 2

Tooth surface measurement processes of the specimens: (a) the pinion and (b) the gear

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Fig. 3

Measurement results of tooth surfaces of specimens before wear tests for (a) the pinion and (b) the gear

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Fig. 4

Gear transmission reliability test rig for wear tests

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Fig. 5

Contact lines of the theoretical tooth surface

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Fig. 6

Real tooth surface model with tooth surface errors eg(ug, φg)

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Fig. 7

Geometric parameters of an involute gear tooth

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Fig. 8

Total normal contact load acting on asperities of the real tooth surface model

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Fig. 9

Local coordinate systems Sep(e1p,e2p,np) and Seg(e1g,e2g,ng), and the direction of wear progression at the contact point M

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Fig. 10

Micropitting process of tooth surfaces of (a) pinion and (b) gear specimens before wear tests and after running 5 × 106, 1.0 × 107, 1.5 × 107, 2.0 × 107, 2.5 × 107, 3.0 × 107, and 3.5 × 107 pinion cycles

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Fig. 11

Micropitting on a tooth surface of the gear specimen after running 3.5 × 107 pinion cycles

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Fig. 12

Measurement result of the tooth surface of the gear specimen after running 3.5 × 107 pinion cycles

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Fig. 13

Micropitting simulation results of real tooth surface models of pinion and gear specimens

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Fig. 14

Wear simulation result of the real tooth surface model of the gear specimen after running 3.5 × 107 pinion cycles

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Fig. 15

Wear performance of the real tooth surface model of the gear specimen after running 3.5 × 107 pinion cycles in the trochoidal interference zone for (a) sliding distances and (b) contact stresses

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Fig. 16

Worn tooth surfaces of the gear specimen after running (a) 8.5 × 107 and (b) 1.05 × 108 pinion cycles

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Fig. 17

Simulation results of triangular spalling wear progression and local microgeometry features of the gear specimen after running (a) 8.5 × 107 and (b) 1.05 × 108 pinion cycles

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