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research-article

The effect of anisotropy on the percolation threshold of sealing surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhimeng Yang

Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing, 100081, China
bitzhimengyang@gmail.com

Jianhua Liu

Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing, 100081, China
jeffliu@bit.edu.cn

Xiaoyu Ding

Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing, 100081, China
xiaoyu.ding@bit.edu.cn

Feikai Zhang

Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing, 100081, China
zhangfkbit@163.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041616 History: Received March 14, 2018; Revised September 25, 2018

Abstract

The percolation threshold strongly affects sealing performance. This paper investigates the relationship between the percolation threshold and rough surface anisotropy, which is represented by the Peklenik number, ?. We generated a series of anisotropic rough surfaces and used the conjugate gradient-fast Fourier transform (CG-FFT) method to determine the percolation threshold. We established that the percolation threshold was equal to A/A0 ≈ 0.484±0.009 (averaged over 45 surfaces) for an isotropic rough surface (?=1). Furthermore, we also found that the percolation threshold decreased from A/A0 ≈ 0.528±0.011 to A/A0 ≈ 0.431±0.008 as 1/? increased from 0.6 to 2. Our results differ from the theoretical result of Persson et al., where A/A0=?/(1+?). Comparing our calculated results with the theoretical results established the presence of a turning point value of 1/? that was related to the effect of elastic deformation on the percolation threshold. When 1/? was smaller than the turning point value, our calculated results were lower than the theoretical ones; and when 1/? was greater than the turning point value, our calculated results were higher than the theoretical ones.

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