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Research Papers: Lubricants

On the Thermocapillary Migration at the Liquid and Solid Aspects

[+] Author and Article Information
Yajuan Ji

National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Helicopter Transmission,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China
e-mail: jiyajuan@foxmail.com

Qingwen Dai

National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Helicopter Transmission,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China
e-mail: daiqingwen@nuaa.edu.cn

Wei Huang

National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Helicopter Transmission,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China
e-mail: huangwei@nuaa.edu.cn

Xiaolei Wang

National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Helicopter Transmission,
Nanjing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics,
Nanjing 210016, China
e-mail: xlwanggo163@163.com

1The authors contributed equally to the work.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Tribology. Manuscript received December 28, 2018; final manuscript received June 5, 2019; published online June 27, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Noel Brunetiere.

J. Tribol 141(9), 091802 (Jun 27, 2019) (7 pages) Paper No: TRIB-18-1531; doi: 10.1115/1.4043972 History: Received December 28, 2018; Accepted June 05, 2019

Thermocapillary migration is an interfacial phenomenon that describes liquid flow on a nonisothermal surface from warm to cold regions in the absence of external forces. It is a typical lubricant loss mechanism in tribosystems. To ensure continued reliability of lubricated assemblies, knowledge of the migration capacity of different liquids and solids is needed. In the present work, migration experiments were conducted on various liquid lubricants on different solid surfaces. It was found that polar lubricants such as ionic liquids and polyethylene glycol hardly migrate on the tested surfaces, and the antimigration capacity of the polytetrafluoroethylene surface was discovered to be very high. Particular attention is paid to the migration mechanism associated with surface tension and contact angle. General guidelines for evaluating the migration capacities of different liquids on solids are proposed.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

Surface morphology and roughness of (a) Au, (b) Ti, and (c) PTFE coatings

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Fig. 5

Migration of diester droplets on different surfaces: (a) the migration phenomenon and (b) migration distance and average migration velocity over 30 s

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Fig. 2

Correlation between surface tension and temperature for polar and nonpolar lubricants

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Fig. 1

Chemical structures of the lubricants used

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Fig. 4

Schematic illustration of the apparatus used in this study

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Fig. 6

Migration processes and velocities of different lubricants on Au surfaces

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Fig. 7

(a) Comparison of the migration capacities of all the tested lubricants (5 µL droplets) on different surfaces and (b) variation in the surface area of migrating droplets

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Fig. 8

(a) Comparison of the migration capacities of all the tested lubricants (10 µL droplets) on different surfaces and (b) variation in the surface areas of migrating droplets

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Fig. 9

Cross section of a migrating liquid droplet on a nonisothermal surface

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Fig. 10

Calculated values of the dimensionless number (H∗) for all lubricants on different surfaces

Tables

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