0
Research Papers: Coatings and Solid Lubricants

Tribological and Wetting Properties of TiO2 Based Hydrophobic Coatings for Ceramics

[+] Author and Article Information
Sridhar Lanka

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: slanka@uwm.edu

Evgeniya Alexandrova

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: ealexandrova@bloomcos.com

Marina Kozhukhova

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: marina.kozhukhova@obg.com

Md Syam Hasan

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: mdsyam@uwm.edu

Michael Nosonovsky

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: nosonovs@uwm.edu

Konstantin Sobolev

College of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
3200 N. Cramer St.,
Milwaukee, WI 53211
e-mail: sobolev@uwm.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Tribology Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Tribology. Manuscript received February 5, 2019; final manuscript received June 25, 2019; published online July 17, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Yi Zhu.

J. Tribol 141(10), 101301 (Jul 17, 2019) (8 pages) Paper No: TRIB-19-1060; doi: 10.1115/1.4044178 History: Received February 05, 2019; Accepted June 26, 2019

Hydrophobic and self-cleaning photocatalytic ceramics and concrete with potential for the superhydrophobicity are promising novel materials for civil engineering applications including buildings, bridges, road pavements, and airport runways. Due to embedded liquid-repellent properties, such materials have low water and salt absorption and, therefore, enhanced durability. However, in applications requiring high traction (e.g., tire and pavement), there is a concern that reduced adhesion may compromise the friction. This paper reports on wetting, dry friction, and roughness properties of TiO2 coated (hydrophilic) and polymethyl hydrogen siloxane (PMHS) coated (hydrophobic) self-cleaning ceramic tiles. The coefficient of friction values of the tile–rubber interface do not change significantly with the applications of the coatings up to 0.67 for hydrophilic TiO2 based and up to 0.46 for hydrophobic TiO2 + PMHS coatings versus 0.45 for uncoated reference. Friction has adhesion and roughness-related components and this response can be attributed to the roughness component of friction due to TiO2 coating. The challenges related to hydrophobic coatings, including the durability and future research, are also discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Heinrich, G., and Klüppel, M., 2008, “Rubber Friction, Tread Deformation, and Tire Traction,” Wear, 265(7–8), pp. 1052–1060.
Chu, L., Fwa, T. F., and Ong, G. P., 2015, “Evaluating Hydroplaning Potential of Rutted Highway Pavements,” J. Eastern Asia Soc. Transport. Studies, 11, pp. 1613–1622.
Tomita, H., 2015, Tire-Pavement Friction Coefficients. Technical Report R-672, Y-F015-20-01-012.
Jenq, S. T., and Chiu, Y. S., 2009, “Hydroplaning Analysis for Tire Rolling Over Water Film With Various Thicknesses Using the LS-DYNA Fluid-Structure Interactive Scheme,” Computers, Materials and Continua, 11(1), pp. 33–58.
Slone, S., 2015, “High Costs of Winter Road Maintenance, 2013–14,” Capitol Research, The Council of State Governments, http://knowledgecenter.csg.org/kc/system/files/CR_WinterMaintenanceCosts.pdf, Accessed June 1, 2019.
Kaufmann, J. P., 2004, “Experimental Identification of Ice Formation in Small Concrete Pores,” Cem. Concr. Res., 34(8), pp. 1421–1427.
Feng, X., and Jiang, L., 2006, “Design and Creation of Superwetting/Antiwetting Surfaces,” Adv. Mater., 18(23), pp. 3063–3078.
Lafuma, A., and Quéré, D., 2003, “Superhydrophobic States,” Nat. Mater., 2, pp. 457–460. [PubMed]
Flores-Vivian, I., Hejazi, V., Kozhukhova, M. I., Nosonovsky, M., and Sobolev, K., 2013, “Self-Assembling Particle-Siloxane Coatings for Superhydrophobic Concrete,” ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 5(24), pp. 13284–13294. [PubMed]
Arabzadeh, A., Ceylan, H., Kim, S., Gopalakrishnan, K., and Sassani, A., 2016, “Superhydrophobic Coatings on Asphalt Concrete Surfaces,” Transport. Res. Rec., 2551(1), pp. 10–17.
Ramachandran, R., Sobolev, K., and Nosonovsky, M., 2015, “Dynamics of Droplet Impact on Hydrophobic/Icephobic Concrete With the Potential for Superhydrophobicity,” Langmuir, 31(4), pp. 1437–1444. [PubMed]
Ramachandran, R., Kozhukhova, M., Sobolev, K., and Nosonovsky, M., 2016, “Anti-Icing Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Controlling Entropic Molecular Interactions to Design Novel Icephobic Concrete,” Entropy, 18(4), pp. 132.
Sobolev, K., and Batrakov, V. G., 2007, “Effect of a Polyethylhydrosiloxane Admixture on the Durability of Concrete With Supplementary Cementitious Materials,” J. Mater. Civil Eng., 19(10), pp. 809–813.
Faraldos, M., Kropp, R., Anderson, M. A., and Sobolev, K., 2015, “Photocatalytic Hydrophobic Concrete Coatings to Combat Air Pollution,” Catal. Today, 259(1), pp. 228–236.
Paven, M., Mammen, L., and Vollmer, D., 2016, “Challenges and Opportunities of Superhydrophobic/Superamphiphobic Coatings in Real Applications,” Smart Materials for Advanced Environmental Applications, The Royal Society of Chemistry, London, pp. 209–243.
Benedix, R., Dehn, F., Quaas, J., and Orgass, M., 2000, “Application of Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis to Create Self-Cleaning Building Materials,” Lacer, 5, pp. 157–168.
Persson, B. N. J., 2001, “Theory of Rubber Friction and Contact Mechanics,” J. Chem. Phys., 115, pp. 3840.
Moore, D. F., and F, D., 1972, The Friction and Lubrication of Elastomers, Pergamon, Oxford.
Al-Assi, M., and Kassem, E., 2017, “Evaluation of Adhesion and Hysteresis Friction of Rubber–Pavement System,” Appl. Sci., 7(12), p. 1029.
Adam, N. K., 1957, “Use of the Term Young’s Equation for Contact Angles,” Nature, 180, pp. 809–810.
Drelich, J., Chibowski, E., Meng, D. D., and Terpilowski, K., 2011, “Hydrophilic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces and Materials,” Soft Matter, 7(21), pp. 9804–9828.
Kubiak, K. J., Wilson, M. C. T., Mathia, T. G., and Carval, P., 2011, “Wettability Versus Roughness of Engineering Surfaces,” Wear, 271(3–4), pp. 523–528.
Sobolev, K., 2003, “Effect of Complex Admixtures on Cement Properties and the Development of a Test Procedure for the Evaluation of High-Strength Cements,” Adv. Cem. Res., 15(2), pp. 67–76.
Sobolev, K., and Yeginobali, A., 2005, “The Development of High-Strength Mortars With Improved Thermal and Acid Resistance,” Cem. Concr. Res., 35(3), pp. 578–583.
Sobolev, K., 2016, “Modern Developments Related to Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering of Concrete,” Front. Struct. Civil Eng., 10(2), pp. 131–141.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The hydrophilic (0 deg ≤ θ ≤ 90 deg), hydrophobic (90 deg ≤ θ), “over-hydrophobic” (120 deg ≤ θ < 150 deg), and superhydrophobic (150 deg ≤ θ ≤ 180 deg) surfaces, where θ is the CA, Ref. [9]. Reprinted with permission. Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematics of the equipment: (a) tribometer set for the pin-on-flat regime and (b) static rubber pin in the steel holder

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic of the contact angle goniometer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Uncoated ceramic tile (left) and the ceramic tile surface observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) under 1500× magnification (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

The TiO2-phosphate coating applied on the ceramic tile observed with a SEM under 5000× (left) and 5500× (right) magnifications

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

3D images of the surface roughness (20× magnification) for TiO2-phosphate coated samples: (a) uncoated, (b) R2, (c) R5, (d) R7, (e) R9, and (f) O2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

3D images of the surface roughness (20× magnification) for TiO2-phosphate + PMHS coated samples: (a) R2, (b) R5, (c) R7, (d) R9, and (e) O2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Confocal microscope images (20× magnification) of the surface of the coating observed after the tribological test for samples: (a) R2, (b) R5, (c) R7, and (d) R9

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Confocal microscope image (20× magnification) of the surface of the optimal (O2) hydrophobic coating observed after the tribological test

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

CA versus surface roughness for hydrophobic tiles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

COF versus roughness for hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In